RMU COUNSELING CENTER

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For More Information, Contact:

RMU Counseling Center
counseling@rmu.edu
412-397-5900 phone
412-397-5920 fax
Patrick Henry, Lower Level

FACULTY/STAFF > DEPARTMENTS & OFFICES > STUDENT LIFE > COUNSELING CENTER > EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION > ANXIETY & STRESS MANAGEMENT
Anxiety & Stress Management


Stress is a part of day-to-day living. As university students, you may experience stress through meeting academic demands, adjusting to a new living environment, or developing friendships. The stress you experience is not necessarily harmful to your health. Mild forms of stress can act as motivators and energizers. However, if your stress level is too high, medical and social problems can result. Both positive and negative events in one's life can be stressful. However, major life changes are the greatest contributors of stress for most people. They place the greatest demand on resources for coping.


How Stress Affects Us
  1. We take less care of ourselves - eat or sleep more/less often, use substances, exercise less, and spend money.
  2. We are emotionally less stable - crying, mood swings, short temper, depressed.
  3. We struggle to concentrate - unable to make decisions, preoccupied with worries, distracted, and daydreaming.
  4. We become less socially connected - isolate ourselves, loss of interest in our favorite activities, more negative interactions.
  5. Our physical health suffers - getting sick, experiencing physical pains, fatigue.
  6. Our mind suffers - negative thoughts, hopeless thoughts, pessimistic.



Ways to Reduce Stress and Anxiety
  • Take a purposeful break - Do something you find enjoyable at least a half hour every day.
  • Create space for relaxation or meditation exercises.
  • Pay attention to your sources of stress and monitor when your emotional reserve is getting low.
  • Build a safe and happy environment.
  • Call a friend.
  • Go play a sport or game with friends.
  • Challenge negative thoughts.
  • Exercise regularly and eat healthy.
  • Make sure to get at least 6-8 hours of sleep per night. The following infographic explains what                                       happens to your brain, and what it means for you, when you don’t get enough sleep.
Scroll to the bottom of the page to find more resources about stress and anxiety.



Need Help? 
Robert Morris University offers free and confidential counseling services for our students. To schedule an appointment, call the Counseling Center at 412-397-5900, send an email to counseling@rmu.edu, or stop by. 
 
Additional Resources

Half of Us - Feeling Anxious
Half of Us - Feeling Stressed
View videos of real-life stories and learn tips to manage anxiety and stress

ReachOut: Anxiety Fact Sheets
ReachOut fact sheets are written by young people for young people and edited by a mental health professional.
Read real-life stories about anxiety 
here. 

Inner Health Studio
Coping skills and relaxation resources

Strength of Us
An online community for connecting young adults impacted by mental health concerns

Medline Plus
Learn more about stress